Description:

Play as Rem, a young girl trapped in a coma-induced dreamscape.  Avoid the corrupted nurses who roam the creepy hospital halls as you collect Mementos to regain your memories and wake up!


Use mouse + keyboard or a game controller, button prompts will appear on-screen.

Dev Notes:

I have a confession: I don't like this game very much.  After the Workshop I teams merged together, and our professor chose Remembrance (over S.P.A.R.K.) to continue development, a shift in design meant getting rid of the game's linear, puzzle-like levels, it's dark, creepy atmosphere, and its major USP to boot...everything from the first vertical slice that was interesting to me.  Then, I took one look at the codebase, and realized that I could work on it for the whole quarter and still not know where things were located or how all the pieces fit together.  That's when I decided that I would be sticking to project management for this one, and thankfully the team was so large that I could afford to do so.

Not to downplay my contribution: I served as both the assistant producer (again) and the scrum-master for Off Brand Hell Games, which meant that all of our business documents went directly through me.  I drew up a lot of the initial team workflow charts, revamped and edited the entire GDD, tabulated our playtest data, and read and compiled everyone else's dev blog posts for our weekly status reports.  I think I found my calling creating game sell presentations, and when the main producer couldn't make it to our final presentation, I had no problem filling in for him.

So I don't find this game as polished or as fun as any of the others I've worked on in the past, but I was able to use the opportunity to learn a great deal about team communication and workflow, especially trying to constantly coordinate a student team of nineteen.  In our post-mortem, everyone seemed to agree on the importance of staying organized and working under a strong chain of command.  I feel that the team experience and lessons learned were much more valuable than the game we produced.

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